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that gave birth to the country's revolution less than two years ago, this sends president mohamed morsi a message, what freedom fighters say must happen to stop a new cycle of violence in the streets. fox reports live from cairo. also, destruction, more than 40 buildings taking a hit, in an explosion, some leveled, new tonight, neighbors bringing us inside the horror with stories you will never forget. >> you were startled and then heard screaming and everyone in the buildings are screaming. >> windows are shattered and the window frame is down on the floor. >> harris: the search for answers intensifying as we learn more about split-second decisions that saved lives. >>> and his character left hundreds of millions of viewers asking, who shot jr. remembering larry hagman, the man who played the villain, the world couldn't help loving. i'm harris faulkener well, begin with egypt on edge and turmoil and violence spreading and response to a colossal power grab. by egypt's islamist president, mohamed morsi. though country's rocky transition to democracy may hit a brick wall, two days of viol
grab by egypt's president. mohammed morsi is insisting he acted within the rights when he granted himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the word
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and she is set to sit down with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >>> no claim of responsibility on that bus explosion yet but word is that hamas has blessed the attacks. we go to ben wedeman for more on that. >> reporter: what we heard from a nearby mosque is an announcement saying that, quote, unquote, lions from the west bank had carried out that attack in tel aviv. there was also the suggestion in that announcement from the mosque that hamas was somehow responsible for that attack. however, the television affiliated with the hamas movement said yes, they did bless that attack but said it was a, quote, unquote, natural reaction to israel's offensive against the gaza strip. so, there has been no claim of responsibility by hamas or by anybody else at this point regarding that attack. now there was some scattered celebratory gunfire in gaza after news of the attack in tel aviv. i'm not aware of anybody handing out candy. it's important to stress that not everybody supports hamas in the gaza strip. and there are many people who are unhappy with the
is a live look at tahrir square. group of hard-core demonstrators vowing to stay until until mohammed morsi invokes a decree granting himself absolute power. this is how bad the violence got. thousands clashing with police and morsi supporters and new pressure on the president to back down and fear that violence will flare up. steve? >> reporter: the number of those tents put up by protestors has grown. they are intent to stay there throughout the week but the number of protestors on the street has declined dramatically over the last 24 hours. on late friday there were up to 40,000 people on the square. the protests did turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be
egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all the demonstrators angry after president morsi declared some controversial decrees that temporaril
said president mohamed morsi. clearly he felt that his position was greatly strengthened by brokering this peace deal between israel and hamas in gaza. but i think he's overplayed his hand. you just showed that video of the protests there in cairo. we'll have to see where this goes. the great fear is that the muslim brotherhood, like other fascist organizations, will be one man, one vote, one time. and we've seen the muslim blo brotherhood move very swift tloi consolidate their power. >> the u.s. stood squarely behind israel throughout this conflict. does that quiet any critics who thought president obama was soft on israeli security? >> i think it absolutely should. what we saw even before the election here in the united states is that netanyahu has said time and again even in the face of critics that there has been no stronger ally to israel than the united states. the criticism kept comincoming, though. after this incident, i really do think the critics will be quieted. there's a lot of talk about how successful the iron dome program wus was. it deflected over 80% of the rockets th
the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any decisions he made since june. the question was going into this meeting, would he scale back on some of those d
in tamrir square that overthrough egyptian leader mubarak, but this time to his successor, mohammed morsi. >> this is a new era in egypt. and this is not what it was about. and it's about the president from all of these unquestioned rights. and now, it's just, we're way stepped back than where we were before. >> the protests, which include a ransacking of the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, after sweeping new powers that he could issue any decree and any issue would be filed and not to be appealed or overturned by the courts. >> the revolution has passed, but will not stop. the judiciary is a respected institution along with loyal members, those who wish to hide within the institution i'll be watching them. >> morsi says the moves are temporary. in a few month's time and they call a necessary move to defeat holdovers. and the moves have infuriated the opposition, one time egyptian presidential candidate mohammed el baradei says that he's setting himself up. and today, morsi vowed he would not back down. >> i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone. to go against a
today. martha: egyptian president mohammed morsi predicting and in the fighting between israel and gaza strip a perhaps within hours. you would not know it hearing the sirens blaring this hour. there is a scheduled arrival of secretary hillary clinton. this is now we start a brand-new "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. bill: i'm bill hemmer. so far no evidence of that claim by president morsi. secretary clinton left a meeting with president obama. her first stop will be a meeting with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. martha: steven hayes, good morning to you, what do you expect to khreup hillary clinton's visit? >> i think it's an important visit. right now israel needs the united states to be a strong advocate and ally. if you look forward and look at the landscape that is facing israel, particularly over the next year, both in the short term fighting with hamas and then in the long term when you look at potential unrest in syria, in iran, in the region generally, i think this. during this fight the united states needs to signal that we are going to be with israel and going
moment for mohammed morsi. a couple of years ago he was part of the outlawed muslim brotherhood. president obama, and not only that, but netanyahu have talked about the key egyptian rule and president morsi's role in this. the only other wild-card going forward is the iranian backers, specifically islamic jihad inside gaza. hamas does not control all of them, and there is a reasonable chance that iran will put pressure on those groups to break the cease-fire would try to put it on tender hooks for a while to flex their muscles with the israelis. megyn: leland vittert live with breaking news. we will be back with breaking news as the show progresses. in the past 24 hours, hillary clinton met with the palestinian president and the egyptian egyptian leadership who has been mediating between israel and hamas. ahead, we will take a closer look at the role of the cease-fire talks and where this could go from here and what happens if it is not honored and it falls apart. monica crowley joins me live coming up next. important at the numbers in the economic realm. drought fueled by uncer
supporters and opponents of mohamed morsi are calling for mass demonstrations. nbc's jim maceda is high above cairo's tahrir square. jim, good evening. >> reporter: hi, kate. well, of course, tahrir square behind me was ground zero for egypt's 2011 uprising, but lately it's had a similar feel and the smell of tear gas is back in the air. clashes between morsi opponents and riot police raged through the night and into a second day. protesters turning tahrir square into a tent encampment and pledging to target the besieged president until he designs or rescinds the decrees which give him sweeping powers and put him above the law. the move has triggered riots across the country, injuring more than 300 egyptians. "if morsi does that, we'll be exactly like iran, said this protester. "he is making himself not just a dicer, he's making himself a god." he said he had to take action to take radical action to save egypt from hosni mubarak's regime. but egyptians like alid mahmoud, a field medic who lost his friend in the uprising feels cheated by morsi and the islamist. they got his vote, but he says t
with this muslim brotherhood path mohamed morsi. what are the charges he's interested in compromise? >> reporter: he has shown no signs of making a concession. the opposition says they will stay put in tahrir square. they say they won't negotiate until the president makes a complete stepdown. what we could see are parts of the government simply refusing to work. that's what we saw today with two courts. the judges saying we are not going to work until the president backs down. martha: steve harrigan, thank you very much. bill: who exactly is president morsi. he's 61 years old, born in egypt. but educated in the united states. got a ph.d in engineering from the university of southern california in 1982. he also worked for nasa developing engines for the space shuttle program. martha: interesting. president morsi is the leader of the muslim brotherhood he was narrowly elected in june of this year. he became a member of the muslim brotherhood when the organization was banned. one of his goals is to create a state ruled by islamic or sharia laws. the u.s. does not consider the muslim brotherhood a f
islamist president, mohamed morsi and his government, who made this happen. >> christiane amanpour, thank you very much indeed. >>> coming next, rudy giuliani has more on the cease-fire and if it will hold. iversity of pho we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum. so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. aya . >>> i would like especially to thank president obama for his unreserved support for israel's actions in the operation, and for israel's right to defend itself, as well as support for the iron dome systems. >> israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu thanking president obama for standing by israel's side during the fighting. but did the white house handle the crisis effectively. joining me now, former new york mayor and presidential candidate, rudy giuliani joining me, welcome. >> how are you piers? >> i want to read you a tweet from a mut
for a national strike. the protest of a prove by the president there, mohammed morsi granting himself sweeping new powers, a move that since resulted in the violent and widespread protests they've seen. and steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo with the latest. where do the protests go from here? >> rick, the numbers are down today from what we saw on friday and we're likely to see more large scale protest demonstrations in the coming days, after sunday morning prayers and again on tuesday. what we're likely to see then are really competing margins, those who support the president, who feel like his moves are necessary, to break the log jam and to move the country forward and those who think that the president is trying to achieve a dictatorship. those who are trying to block him. so we're going to see more large scale protests and the other things to watch resignation is, three presidential aides have recently resigned in the past two hours and the judges are refusing, so if it continues to grow, this could put much more pressure on the egyptian president and we're looking at tahrir squ
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
's president, mohamed morsi is saying that israel's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end in a few hours. our reza sayeh is there. we'll get an update from him this breaking story. we're right on the other side of this break with his report. >>> welcome back. breaking news to get to. we were hearing and we are waiting for a report from reza sayeh, what egypt's president mohamed morsi is now saying. he is saying that id real's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end some time today, maybe in a few hours and that egyptian-mediated efforts will produce positive results. reza sayeh is reporting for us on this issue. he joins us live. so, back up and give us some detail. is mohamed morsi really the person who would be able to effectively say that this aggression now ends? >> reporter: well, it's tough to say. what we do know is that it's intelligence officials in egypt that are apparently leading the negotiations and the man who is doing it is mohammed mashat. in 2011 he helped to negotiate the release of israeli soldier, which suggests this egyptian spy chief has pretty stron
in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed morsi, it is a big test for the new leader. steve harrigan is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty
the regime of mohammed morsi. this new government is allied closely with hamas. would egypt intervene notwithstanding the peace treaty with israel? >> that is going to be a very tall order for president morsi. yes he is the head of the government and it's in the hands of the muslim brotherhood. egypt is their ally. so out of cairo will be a lot of statements and maybe they could escalated against the camp david agreement. to say that the egyptian armed forces to be pouring into battle by their president is a very difficult thing to imagine. what could happen now is negotiation between cairo, israel and the united states to find a way for a cease-fire. >> gregg: hamas fighters are no match for the israeli military. last ground invasion killed over 1400 palestinians which invites the question, why would hamas break this truce by escalating the rocketed attacks on israel unless they are being directed to do it by their benefactors, their supporters, tehran? >> you know what, this could be the most important question for the debate about the gaza war. i am among those who think hamas does
president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the protest both in favor of and against that country's president. we'll keep an eye on it "happening now." also this fox news alert, holiday shoppers nationwide out in droves to take advantage of black friday tk
as the appeals report suspends work to protest the decrease that gave mohammed morsi near absolute powers. steve harrigan is live in cairo with the very latest, steve. >> those protestors are out again for the 6th night in a row at tahrir square scuffling with police. we've seen exchanges of rocks and teargas on both sides, several protestors coming away injured, police injured as well. nowhere near the numbers we saw last night where as many as 200,000 demonstrators were in the square. they are demanding not only that the president pull back on his decrease but the entire government gets toppled. judges from two of the courts including the appeals court has gone on strike. they say they are not going to work again until the president takes a step back. we are seeing no comprises from president mohammed morsi. in fact we are hearing from his supporters in the muslim brotherhood that they plan on staging major marchs across the nation on saturday in support of mohammed morsi. they have kept their distance perhaps trying to reduce of conflict between two sides. megyn: steve harrigan thank you. new
egyptian president mohammed morsi basically saying you know that judiciary that we have? you know the judges that we have? if i make a decision, they are not going to be able to review anything that i do anymore. essentially cutting out the judiciary becoming by all accounts a dictator. >> yeah. all the checks on his power were essentially removed. and it did appear that this guy became a dick day or two overnight. what was worrisome about it is how quickly it all happened. and basically a 12 to 24 hour span after the united states congratulated mohammed morsi on doing such a great job helping to broker a peace agreement between hamas and israel which may beer maybe not. maybe he did a great job. there are also arms being smuggled through egypt so maybe he got too much credit. >> he seized the day. his name is on top of all newspapers. here i am, i need to consolidate power this morning. >> charles krauthammer believes there is a connection between the praise that came from the united states and what president morsey has done now in egypt. >> i'm not surprised at all that the brot
're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basicall
got the egyptian president, mohamed morsi to be the address if hamas breaks the ceasefire and begins firing rockets into israel again, that egypt will be responsible, and will be held responsibility, they have taken responsibility, but this is a verbal agreement, this is not a written agreement, there is no implementation mechanism in place, this is really just a cooling-off period. to see if negotiators can really get at the root issues that are the smuggling tunnels for weapons coming in to the gaza strip, many from iran and the sinai desert, and whether hamas will be disarmed in the end. lou: the stubborn choice for both, palestinians and the israelis, the right to govern themselves, versus the right assurance guaranteed security. how surprising is it, to you, that israel would agree to this ceasefire on the same day a bomb goes off in tel aviv? >> well, it was quite surprising to me, lou, last time there was a terror attack in tel tel avivs who, 006, was in 2006, i remember, i was covering those bombings, so, usually what would happen after such an incident, israel would respond,
-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wanted him to depart. he is an ally of iran. he has not only killed 40,000 of his own people, he's tried to make a secret nuclear military program, he's helped in providing tens and tens of thousands of missiles to terrorists in lebanon and gaza. he is a loose cannon. we want him gone. we want to see a democratic and peac
there, because mohammed morsi right now from the muslim brotherhood has a choice to make. will he cut off the arms that are supplied in the gaza strip through egypt? or will he not? will he continue to let iran play in israel's backyard with their rockets? the choice is his. >> bob: exactly why hamas is testing the muslim brotherhood to see if they will go ahead or enter in diplomacy. every negotiation in peace treaty started with the 1967 borders. the argument here from hamas' stand point is egypt going to stand with them or with the international community? egypt has always been in forefront of negotiating the peace treaties. 'canes is the first time -- >> dana: is the first time an eruption has happened since arab spring in egypt. >> andrea: look back to history a lot of the wars that egypt fought was with israel. mubarak. mubarak was an ally of israel. people forget that. now because we have told him to step down and he left, we now have the muslim brotherhood in. egypt is not a friend of israel. netanyahu is looking at this going wait a minute. to your point, we are supposed to n
idea. later more chaos in the streets of cairo as egyptian president mohamed morsi faces protests over his power grab. so will the obama administration step up and condemn the 9/11 truther and the one that wants to wipe israel off the map? straight ahead. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! >> it means i'm going to smoke a lot of weed tonight! >> sean: earlier this month, colorado and washington became the first states to legalize marijuana for recreational use. now left wingers claim there's overwhelming support for these initiatives because they allow state governments to tax the drug, therefore drive up state revenue, but could the sad reality be this is just a cultural shift that's taking place in america? so in other words, is getting stoned now becoming more acceptable? so the? joining me now with the answers, fox news cont
passage of a new constitution. all across egypt this evening, people watched as president mohamed morsi spoke to state television interviewers addressed the nation. he defended his decision to grant himself powers free from judicial review. >> ( translated ): my responsibility is to protect this nation from any conspiracy or from any attempt to go backwards. as the country's president my responsibility, is to achieve justice and respect the laws and to lay down many rules in the absence of parliament until they convene and are able to vote on behalf of the people. >> brown: the islamist president also criticized the outpouring of protests against his actions. on tuesday, at least 200,000 people filled cairo's tahrir square, accusing morsi and his muslim brotherhood of hijacking last year's revolution. liberal and secular groups also condemned a move to fast-track a final vote on a new constitution. >> ( translated ): we want a constitution that represents all egyptian people, not one that represent a certain faction of egyptians. >> ( translated ): the constitutional panel tasked to >>
to demand the overthrow of the first democratically elected president mohammed morsi. >> now we have president morsi and we don't understand is f he is the president of egypt or muslim brotherhood. >> they walked in out protest. >> there are concerns over the lack of protection and women's rights and the role of islamic law as a source for many legislation. it places some constraint on the presidential power. limiting the president to two four-year terms and it provides for civilian oversight of the military. president morsi has vowed to give up the powers he assumed last week the started the protest, as soon as the constitution is ratified. he has 15 days to give it to referendum. >> this is critical until they draft the constitution and it goes to people to decide. >> opposition leaders are vowing to sleep in the square until morsi denounces his decree. >> despite the protests. egypt president has the broad public backing and members of the political party from the muslim brotherhood hold demonstrations in support of the president on saturday. bret? >> bret: steve harrigan live sat
24 hours to egyptian president mohamed morsi who has been leading the negotiations in cairo. and secretary of
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
that triggered the egyptian revolution last year. president mohamed morsi said he will meet with his supreme judicial counsel tomorrow but that's not helping calm in cairo today. reza has staid up late. and he joins us now. what are you hearing about death on the streets in northern egypt today? what can you tell us about that? >> reporter: yeah, martin, obviously we've seen a lot of violence over the past few days. we've reported hundreds of injuries. tonight we're reporting the first death. according to the muslim brotherhood spokesperson, a 15-year-old boy by the name of islam masoud was killed when anti-morsi protesters tried to attack the muslim brotherhood's office in a northern city. he's being described as a member of the brotherhood's youth group. apparently these attackers had knives and clubs and sticks. the muslim brotherhood is telling us that masoud was hit in the head with a club. he was rushed to the hospital but before he got there he was pronounced dead. at this point the brotherhood doesn't look like they're using this fatality as a rallying cry to stir things up, but we'l
: president mohamed morsi, gave himself almost unchecked powers and sent thousands into the streets, the people who have been helping to topple hosni mubarak, now, who they are calling the new egyptian pharaoh. are we headed for a you new islamist coup and islamist state in egypt. >> it could be headed that way and also could be headed back to a military takeover, if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there is continued chaos. i'll never forget, chris, after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square, and, a young woman said, senator mccain it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. that is what we have to worry about, a repeat of the iranian experience in the 1970s, and -- but, what should the u.s. be doing, saying, this is unacceptable and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you p
, the political crisis took a new turn, as two top appellate courts went on strike against president mohammed morsi. they said they won't return to work until morsi rescinds decrees giving himself near absolute power. at the same time, the supreme constitutional court rejected morsi's claims that it's undermining his government. >> ( translated ): the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized from any threat or blackmail and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone, no matter how forcible the pressure. and the supreme constitutional court is ready to face this, whatever the consequences, which could be a high price, even if the price is the life of its judges. >> sreenivasan: the courts' actions came a day after nationwide protests against morsi's decrees. and late today, there was word the egyptian leader will address the country tomorrow about his actions and the response. rebels in eastern congo have begun pulling out of territory they seized from government troops just last week. neighboring countries had issued an ultimatum for the m-23 fighters to withdraw
criticism continues to pour in against a power grab by egyptian president mohamed morsi threatening to derail the country's post revolutionary progress. four straight nights of protests and security officials say one teenager was killed and 40 others hurt when the demonstrations turned violent sunday. the protests began after morsi expanded power including preventing courts from revoking his decisions. joining me new is michael sink. protesters calling him a dictator, no better than ho mubarak. >> this is the ate latest in a series of moves he engaged in. in august he sidelined egypt's military council and took their powers for himself, the legislative and constitutional assembly powers they had and the only check remaining on his power after that time was the judiciary and now he swept aside that check. he has consolidated all power for thims and asked the people to trust him and guide egypt through this transitional period. >> protesters want him to step down. what do you see happening here? >> looks like neither side is prepared to back down. you're right. they're not prepared to
this is where they will remain until president mohamed morsi backs away from his controversial decree, which says no person, no authority can overrule his decisions until a new constitution is put in place. >>> tissue samples from yasser arafat's body are in the hands of forensic experts. his grave was opened today in ramallah. samples were taken from his remains. the exact cause of the former palestinian leader's death has long been a mystery. now testing will be done to find out if arafat was in fact poisons. >> the indications we have or the convictions we have that israel have done this assassination but yet we still need evidence. >> israel meantime denied those allegations. >>> a fiery scene in downtown sydney, australia, today. look at this with me and you'll see a cab, look at this, of a construction crane engulfed in flames, black smoke. it gets worse. because this is the moment when the crane, this arm here collapses, falls into a building, barely misses the busy street below. here's where the story gets a little bit more intriguing. the operator of the crane was also the manager o
-year-old activist, and to voice their opposition to president mohamed morsi and the muslim brotherhood. this ireport showing protesters as they carried the teenager's casket through tahrir square to a cemetery. morsi declared the court cannot overturn decisions he has made since coming into office in june. one opponent says it can only lead to a dictatorship. morsi insists that he is trying to protect egypt's fragile arab spring, revolution, not accumulate unchecked power. >>> and if you're traveling through the northeast today, well, you might be dealing with a little bit of snow. meteorologist alexandra steele is in for rob marciano today. what are we looking at, alexandra? >> hey, good morning to you guys. yeah, we are seeing snow, even in new york city. all the big cities, boston, new york, philadelphia, a little snow. not much in the way of accumulation, really along the big cities and the 95 corridor, but still you'll see it come down. kind of get new the christmas spirit. we do have winter weather advisories and we will see accumulati accumulations. want to show you where. here'
maccallum. gregg: i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. hillary clinton met with mohammed morsi, and another meeting with mahmoud abbas, and then with benjamin netanyahu she expressed a commitment to israel. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwaivering, that is why we believe it is essential to de-escalate the situation in gaza. heather: doug mcelway joins us live if the white house. what is the latest with the talks with secretary clinton? >> reporter: no read out yet on the talks ao egyptian president morsi yet. we did get a read out on her talks with mahmoud abbas. no signs of any kind of progress or breakthrough, but just appreciation for the effort. the move towards the cease-fire very much come phra ka*eulted by thcomplicated by a terrorist attack on a bus. the white house condemned the attack in the strongest language. these attacks against israeli civilians are outrageous. the united states will stand with our israeli allies and identify and bring to justice the perpetrators of this attack. that statement very much in line with a number of administration
in egypt. mohamed morsi gave himself complete control of egypt days after president obama praised him for hoping to broker a truce between israel and hamas. all of this raising questions about our relationship with a country we support with $2 billion a year in aid. john bolton who is also a fox news contributor. we sat together, watched the arab spring in wera concerns a pro western dictator was going to go and get replaced by some sort of democratic process. a lot of people watched that arab spring thinking its many democracy. you said repeatedly be careful what you wish for. now we have the muslim brotherhood dictator? is that what he is? >> i think he's an aspiring muslim brotherhood dictator. perhaps he anticipated it, perhaps he didn't. maybe they will find a compromise solution. what was important was it showed his true colors. this is the way he wants to go. he wants to be insulated from judicial review. he consequence a constitution that's congenial for the muslim brotherhood and he felt emboldened 24 hours after the announcement of the gaza cease-fire to make this power grab
of references to islamic sharia law. in cairo, tens of thousands protested, denouncing president mohammed morsi. in an all-night session of parliament dominated by islamic. opposition groups say that the document has a clear view towards sharia law. raising fears of state enforced islamic moral code. the draft is expected to be delivered to president morsi tomorrow. new controversy today over a pension crisis running the state of illinois. and whether american taxpayers and all the other states may soon have to put their bill. according to the pew research center, illinois has the most underfunded public pension system in the entire country. the funding ratio of just 45%. 45% funded. estimated $95 billion short of where they need to be to pay out the promised pension. a problem that pat quinn says needs to be fixed to find a solution. it is harder to come by. here is a video that we just released. the governor squeezing the pension python. >> sometimes they make smaller payments than what they promise. the investments that we made with that pension fund, the great recession can hit us hard. plu
's leaders are in the middle of this dispute, a cease-fire between the two sides is possible. mohamed morsi met with leaders of turkey, qatar, and the leaders of hamas there are no guarantees, but working to try to ensure a cease-fire. benjamin netanyahu says he's willing to discuss a cease-fire when hamas agrees to stop rocket fire from gaza. >>> thousands expected to march in washington, in opposition to the controversial keystone pipeline. the event organized by the westside 350.org and promises to support the president if he says no to the pipeline protesters will circle the white house. it's part of the organization's month-long tour across the country. earlier this year, president obama blocked the pipeline because of environmental concerns. many republicans say that the pipeline would have created thousands of jobs. >>> notice lights out on capitol hill last night, no reason to be afraid of the dark. police say the lights that illuminate the dome of the u.s. capitol were turned off for scheduled maintenance. usually you can see the famous dome from miles away on any given night. ligh
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